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Blue Print for the Skin?

 

Despite the fact that I was outside working in the lavender fields for most of my days in France, the month still managed to leave me a bit chubby and sluggish for my return stateside. I’m gonna go ahead and name macarons, croissants, butter, cheese, and wine as the primary culprits for this quick transformation (oh, it was good...). Once I was home, though, the nasty aftermath settled in, so I decided to embark on a Blue Print Cleanse (“BPC," for short). The BPC, which I’ve done a couple times previously, was a perfect tool to help me begin eating properly again; and although I’ve unfortunately snapped back to a few bad habits since cleansing, I can honestly say that it made me feel absolutely wonderful, and even made my skin glow (which I only realized when my boss, a skincare expert, pointed it out)!

This time around, I decided to take full advantage of the cleanse by following each and every piece of advice on the company’s website. I did it all. I’m talking everything from easing my diet in and out; dry brushing my skin; hot yoga and exercise; drinking detox herbal teas; and so on and so forth. All the while, though, I just couldn’t help but thinking that there was one piece of advice missing…skin care for cleansing, of course!

Here I was, only taking in the good stuff, and getting rid of all the bad; so why on Earth would I ever put anything toxic on my (exfoliated and vulnerable) skin—the biggest organ I have?! While I obviously try to steer clear of toxic skincare products, as their ingredients end up in the same places as the food we eat (or, in this case, the juices we drink), this particular cleanse got me thinking…I wonder what products Zoe Sakoutis and Erica Huss, the genius founders of BPC, use while cleansing, and what skincare lines (if any…) they would recommend to their BPC followers? I can take a few guesses (see below) but I won’t ever really know until I hear it from the Cleanse Queens, themselves. Hopefully (for them) I’m not uncovering the next phase of their expansion plan…because itwould be an excellent one!

1) Homemade

As I've mentioned in the past, the only way to be absolutely certain that you’re not consuming anything toxic through your skincare products is to make them yourself. You’d be surprised how common this is, yet you probably wouldn't be if it ended up that raw foodist Lady of Cleanse Zoe Sakoutis takes this precaution, herself.

2) Dr. Alkaitis

An all-time personal favorite, this line of incredibly wholesome, completely chemical-free products has been formulated as a “raw health food” for the skin, and it seriously works! Many models and celebrities have caught onto this brand (I will discuss it further in a later post) and I could see the Ladies of Cleanse using these products.

 

3) Tata Harper

Despite never hearing back from requests to speak to Tata (or anyone from her company, even!) I still must say that her line is extremely wholesome and cleanse-friendly. My favorite part:ingredients are grown on her Vermont Farm, Julius Kingdom, where the company’s labs are (apparently…) located.

 

4) RMS Beauty

For some color, I could see Zoe and Erica using Rose-Marie Swift’s healthy cosmetics line. This is the first line of organic color cosmetics, and while I haven’t tried many of the products, they get rave reviews, to say the least.

Of course, these are only a few educated guesses... Perhaps I’ll have the opportunity to learn about the skincare lines Zoe Sakoutis and Erica Huss use and support sometime down the line. Until then, though, please remember to pay attention to what you're consuming through your skin. They might not be as imminent as those associated with a food cleanse, but the benefits of refreshing your skincare routine are also countless and extremely important.

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